Tag Archive: small business

Our business’s COVID-19 procedures

May 25, 2020 Published by . 1 Comment

Man, this pandemic has been rough.  On everyone.  And especially on small businesses like ours.  But we’ve been happy to follow all state and city guidelines for closing, reopening, and operating safely.  Nothing is more important than the health and safety of our clients and staff, so we will be taking thorough precautions before, during, and after every photo shoot, and adjusting our procedures as we all learn more about COVID-19 and how it spreads.

To that end, here’s a breakdown of changes you’ll be seeing in how we operate:

General procedures:

  • Increased cleaning in the studio and equipment, using cleaning supplies with disinfectant.
  • Appointment booking and reminder emails provide instructions for a safe shoot.
  • Staff is required to alert the Studio Manager if they feel any symptoms or have been in recent contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 so their shoots can be covered or rescheduled and they can self-quarantine for at least 14 days.

In the studio:

  • Both you and the photographer must wear a mask / face covering and refrain from handshakes / physical contact during the shoot.
  • Everyone must immediately wash their hands upon arrival at the studio.
  • Instead of the photographer adjusting your hair or clothing during the shoot, a mirror will be provided, and/or live-viewing of the photos on a monitor.
  • After every shoot, high-touch areas will be wiped with a disinfectant before the next visitor is allowed entry.
  • Upon arrival, you will also have your temperature taken with a contact-free thermometer and asked the following questions before being allowed entry:
    • Have you had a fever, cough, or cold/flu-like symptoms in the past 14 days?
    • Have you had contact with anyone who has shown any cold/flu-like symptoms in the past 14 days?

On-site shoots:

  • All our staff members will wear a mask / face covering.
  • We will maintain social distancing and no physical contact with your employees while in your office.
  • When each person enters the room where we are set up for photos, we will ask them to sanitize their hands (we will bring hand sanitizer).
  • Surfaces and objects touched will be wiped with disinfectant (we will bring disinfecting wipes) between each person.
  • Instead of the photographer adjusting your hair or clothing during the shoot, a mirror will be provided.
What you'll do to keep us safe

Hair and makeup artists:

  • Hair and makeup artists will wear a mask / face covering and, if available, a face shield.
  • All surfaces will be sanitized between each person.
  • In the studio only, if you are having makeup done you will be asked to wash your face before makeup begins.
  • Since a mask is not possible during makeup application, you will be given some paper towels to hold so that if you feel a cough or sneeze coming, you can cough/sneeze into the paper towels.
  • As is already customary, all makeup is applied with as many disposable products as possible and all non-disposable products are used once and sanitized.
  • Hair and makeup artists already wash their hands before beginning, but you will now have the option of them using disposable gloves if you prefer.

Being a “non-essential business” makes us feel a little small

April 1, 2020 Published by . Leave your thoughts

When COVID-19 lockdowns started closing businesses and obliging everyone to shelter in place in their homes, we watched our studio’s appointment calendar almost completely clear out.  And when the governor ordered “non-essential” businesses to shutter their doors, it stung a little, to be honest, since anyone’s paycheck can feel pretty darn essential once it disappears.  It’s for a heckuva good reason, of course—and we’re happy to do our part in flattening the curve and stopping the virus from spreading by postponing photo shoots and implementing new systems to keep the studio and everyone who enters it safe. 

We’re all in this same strange boat together: feeling anxious because of the pandemic, feeling concerned for our clients and their families and for the health of everyone around us, and feeling uneasy about what’s going to happen next.  Without our cameras, we’ve all been coping mostly by catching up on photo editing (or re-editing old photos just for funsies), baking bread, snuggling our pets, cleaning some closets, and otherwise keeping busy in the same ways everyone else with cleared calendars has been occupying their time.

We’re also all enduring by flexing our creative muscles.  One person at a time, we each went into the empty studio last week, put our cameras on timers, took some photos of ourselves, and used some post-production magic to be inserted into pictures of vintage cameras.  The result is a series of images that reflect how we’re feeling while we’re missing our clients’ beautiful faces and the sounds of a camera shutter going KER-CHUNK.  We’re feeling a bit like the forgotten old film cameras that have been collecting dust on our shelves.  Lonely.  Bored.  Restless.  Small.  But coping well.

Organic Headshots
Organic Headshots

Portrait photography is inherently a very social business.  We need to be around people in order photograph them, and being unable to do so is… well… making us sad.  But whenever this is all over and we’re in the studio for back-to-back sessions again or traveling to our clients’ offices when buildings are filled with people again, we’ll feel back to our old selves.  We’re looking forward to that day and to hearing all about our clients’ lockdown adventures in breadmaking.  We’re sure a lot of people will be getting back to work in different ways then, and we might be helping some people through job changes by updating their LinkedIn profile photos, and photographing companies for their marketing materials as they boost new business to make up for what was lost.

Organic Headshots
Organic Headshots
Organic Headshots
Organic Headshots

It’s unusual for it to be so lonesome in the studio: a room that’s part workshop, part laboratory, and part oasis.  A place where people come to collaborate to create images with common goals. Taking these photos alone in the still and quiet space was a somber act.  But also faintly blissful.  We’re ready to get KER-CHUNKING again when it’s time.  Until then, we’ll be cleaning our lenses and trying not to pout.  Too much.

Is a headshot tax deductible?

March 2, 2020 Published by . Leave your thoughts

Learn the situations where you can write off photography on your tax return

Professional headshots are an important part of your career, whether you’re searching for a job, starting out or promoting yourself as an established freelancer, or putting together marketing materials for your business. But when are headshots a business expense? Being able to deduct expenses on your taxes is a great perk for some situations, and an absolute must for others.

So we asked Illinois and Indiana licensed CPA Michael Tunney everything you need to know about deducting the cost of headshots and photography services, and man did we learn a lot! Check out his answers to our burning tax questions:

Is my headshot for LinkedIn tax deductible if I am searching for a new job?

Not anymore. In December of 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was signed into law. This new tax law completely eliminated the Unreimbursed Employee Business Expenses deduction for 2018 through 2025. This deduction was included as part of the Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions section of the 1040, and job search related costs were recorded on this schedule. However, there are a handful of states that still include this break, including Arkansas, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and New York.

If my employer asks for a headshot but does not pay for it, can I deduct my headshot on my income tax return?

Just like the above scenario, no.  If a taxpayer is an employee the Unreimbursed Employee Business Expense section of the 1040 has been eliminated and is only included on certain states income tax returns.

Is a headshot or any marketing photos I have taken of me tax deductible if I am a self-employed freelancer and do not have an LLC or Corporation?

Yes! If a tax payer is self-employed and not an LLC, LLP, Partnership or Corporation, the individual would complete a Schedule C Form-Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship).  On this form, the taxpayer would be able to include headshots (photographers fees and duplication costs) and marketing photos on the “Other Expenses” section of the Schedule C of the 1040 form.

Is a makeup artist or a haircut tax deductible for my headshot session?

Yes, if the taxpayer is self-employed and not an employee of a company.  Expenses directly related to the headshot session, such as makeup and a haircut are deductible as a business expense.  If clothing is purchased or rented for a special shoot, a tax payer can also deduct those “props” as a business expense.

I own a business– can my business deduct the cost of a photographer’s services?

Yes, if a tax payer is a partner of a partnership or a shareholder/owner of a corporation and the photographer’s services are used by the business for marketing purposes, headshots (photographer’s fees and duplication costs) can be deducted as a business expense.

Book your Chicago headshot session with Organic Headshots here, or reach out to Michael Tunney’s office for your tax questions!

My small business hero is my mechanic

April 28, 2015 Published by . Leave your thoughts

rod-60I drive all the way from Logan Square to Forest Park every 3 months for my oil changes because I freaking love my mechanic. Rod at Elite Tire was referred to me by an old friend of mine several years ago after I had this conversation with the Honda dealership I was taking my car to before:

Dealership:  “You need to have your oil pan replaced.  The threads on the cap are all worn and the cap could fall off at any moment and your engine will explode.”

Me:  “Umm… how on earth did the threads get worn?’

Dealership:  “It usually happens when the morons who change your oil tighten the cap too hard.”

Me:  “But I only come here for oil changes.  Wouldn’t that make you guys the morons?”

Dealership:  “I don’t see the connection.”

My friend insisted I go to Rod instead because he recommended she get a new car when her old beater-mobile was giving her some trouble.  He said she’d be better off selling the car while it would still get Blue Book value and getting a newer, more reliable car.  She was impressed that instead of bleeding money out of her by insisting on costly repairs to an old car (as the unfortunate mechanic stereotype goes), he gave her honestly good advice about her car- advice that makes his bills and income lower than if she kept her old car.

Portrait chicagoFor my first oil change I sat in the waiting area and watched Rod have the absolute most patient conversation with a customer I have ever witnessed in my entire life.  A little old lady with a bit of a nasty attitude was angry because she needed some parts replaced since they were worn down and corroded.  She threw her hands in the air and said, “I can’t see how they possibly need to be replaced!  I’ve had the car for 10 years and only drive it once a week and have never had anything go wrong with it.”  She was actually the quintessential “little old lady who only drives her car once a week to church and back and is terrified of being ripped off” right there in the flesh.  Rod brought out an example of what her car’s parts looked like, and a fresh sample, and proceeded to not just explain, but physically demonstrate exactly what was happening, why, and how.

He stayed with her and talked to her like an intelligent human being for a solid 20 minutes until she was confident and satisfied.  He never talked down to her or lost his cool.  He stood next to her instead of talking to her from behind a counter.  I sat there thinking THIS IS MY MECHANIC FOR LIFE NOW.

Every time I see Rod and his crew for my oil changes I’m visiting a model for how I want to run my own business.  The office is a well-oiled machine where every task gets the time and attention necessary to get things done right, and each customer who walks through the door is treated like a good friend.  Someone always answers the phone and is always at the desk to greet the next customer (99.9% of the time it’s Rod himself), and everything is done quickly as a priority but without it feeling like a frantic, high-stress environment. rod-31a-bThere’s no clutter in the workshop or the waiting area: everything is clean and under control at all times.  At my most recent trip one of the mechanics had some time between cars to service so he thoroughly cleaned an already spotless bathroom.

When I talk to a new client about their photography project I channel my mechanic and treat each client like they’re my only client while I talk to them.  We work together to figure out what their photo needs are and how I can take photos for them that are exactly what they need and that they can be proud of.  When they have questions, I have quick answers.  When my answers don’t suffice or there are follow-up questions, I keep with the conversation until there is mutual understanding and trust.  I’ve had hour-long phone conversations with clients who didn’t even book me and I don’t see it as wasted time.

Keep up the good work, Rod- you’re my small business hero.

PS- there may actually be a post-it note on my desk that says “how would Rod handle this situation?”